Football Favoritism at F.S.U.: The Price One Teacher Paid – The New York Times

 

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — As the Florida State University football team was marching to a national title in the fall of 2013, the school was investigating allegations of academic favoritism involving a half-dozen of its leading players, including one who scored the winning touchdown in the championship game.

The inquiry, previously unreported, stemmed from a complaint by a teaching assistant who said she felt pressured to give special breaks to athletes in online hospitality courses on coffee, tea, and wine, where some handed in plagiarized work and disregarded assignments and quizzes. The assistant, a 47-year-old doctoral student named Christina Suggs, provided emails and other evidence in late August 2013 to the Florida State inspector general, an independent office. But her case was soon taken over by the university’s attorney.

Source: Football Favoritism at F.S.U.: The Price One Teacher Paid – The New York Times

2017-09-01T10:47:15+00:00

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